Building High-Performing Sales Teams: Accountability, Strategy, and Success

Building High-Performing Sales Teams: Accountability, Strategy, and Success

Navigating the complexities and ensuring a robust and productive team are pivotal to achieving sustained success in sales. Accountability within a sales team requires pinpointing underperformance and creating an environment where feedback is constructive and growth is nurtured. The notion that no team member should be surprised by a change in their employment status underscores the importance of transparent communication. Setting realistic expectations and having regular discussions ensures that salespeople know where they stand and what is expected of them.

Underperformance can stem from various factors, but a common issue highlighted is the lack of skills. Identifying this gap is the first step toward rectification, paving the way for targeted coaching and development. Coaching isn’t just about improving skills; it’s about instilling the right behaviors that drive success. This is particularly crucial in small businesses where the owners might juggle multiple roles, potentially overlooking critical aspects of their operations, including sales.

The dialogue also touches upon the importance of diversifying strategies beyond a single mode of customer engagement. For instance, relying solely on email without integrating calls can limit a salesperson’s effectiveness. Similarly, focusing too intensely on a single key account to the detriment of prospecting new clients can jeopardize overall sales performance.

Sales managers play a crucial role in facilitating the development of their team members, not only by setting expectations but also by actively participating in joint sales calls and understanding the challenges their salespeople face. Unfortunately, many sales managers haven’t engaged in such activities with their team members in years, highlighting a gap in leadership engagement that can contribute to underperformance.

Peer accountability, celebrating small wins, and fostering a culture where successes are recognized and rewarded contribute significantly to a healthy sales environment. These practices motivate salespeople and help to identify those struggling, offering them the support needed to improve. It’s a collective effort, emphasizing that sales is not just about individual achievements but about lifting the entire team, reflecting the adage that a rising tide lifts all boats.

Therefore, Addressing underperformance is not just about identifying weaknesses but creating an ecosystem where salespeople are supported, skilled, and motivated to excel. It involves a comprehensive approach, from ensuring adequate training and development to fostering a culture of accountability and support.

For sales managers and CEOs, the key takeaway is the importance of being actively involved in their team’s development, understanding their challenges, and providing the resources and support necessary for success. Sales is a complex and demanding field, but with the right strategies and a supportive environment, outstanding results are possible.

Actionable items that you can use today!

  1. Evaluate Communication and Expectations: Initiate a comprehensive review of your current communication practices and the clarity of expectations within your sales team. Ensure that every member clearly understands their goals, the metrics by which they are evaluated, and the consequences of underperformance. This could involve revising job descriptions, performance metrics, or the regularity and format of feedback sessions.
  2. Implement a Peer Accountability System: Start the process of establishing a peer accountability system by organizing a team meeting to discuss its benefits. Encourage your sales team to share their successes and challenges openly, and pair team members to serve as accountability partners. This system should aim to foster a supportive environment where salespeople can learn from each other and motivate one another toward achieving their sales targets.
  3. Develop a Mini-Coaching Plan: Identify at least one salesperson on your team who may be struggling or showing signs of underperformance. Design a short, targeted coaching plan to address their specific challenges, whether they be skill-based or motivational. This plan could include shadowing a high-performing team member, attending a specific training session, or setting up regular coaching meetings to work on identified areas of improvement.
Building High-Performing Sales Teams through Strategic Alignment

Building High-Performing Sales Teams through Strategic Alignment

The challenge of aligning the right people with the right organizational roles is paramount. As sales leaders and CEOs of small companies, understanding the intricacies of building and maintaining a proficient sales team is crucial for driving growth and achieving success.

The concept of having the “right people in the right seats” is not just a matter of recruitment but an ongoing process of evaluation, development, and strategic alignment. It’s essential to recognize that the adequacy of a sales team is not solely dependent on individual capabilities but also on how these individuals fit within the broader sales strategy and organizational culture.

Compensation plans, customer relationship management (CRM) systems, and the overarching sales infrastructure play significant roles in enabling sales teams to perform at their best. However, the foundation of a high-performing sales team lies in the continuous investment in people. This involves identifying talent and fostering an environment that promotes learning, growth, and adaptation.

Training and development are often overlooked aspects of sales management. Surprisingly, a significant number of sales professionals and leaders go years without receiving formal training. This gap in skill development can lead to stagnation and inefficiency. Therefore, organizations must prioritize ongoing education and training to keep their sales teams agile and competitive.

Furthermore, it is critical that individual roles align with the organization’s goals. This may involve reevaluating existing roles, responsibilities, and processes to ensure they contribute effectively to the sales strategy. Sometimes, the solution does not lie in hiring new talent but in optimizing the current team’s structure and roles to leverage their strengths more effectively.

Performance improvement plans (PIPs) and the concept of “top-grading” the sales team highlight the importance of accountability and continuous improvement. While PIPs can be a tool for addressing performance issues, they should not be the first resort. Instead, leaders should focus on setting clear expectations, providing the necessary resources and support, and fostering a culture of excellence.

Sometimes, the issue may not be with the sales personnel but with the systems, processes, or even the leadership approach. Before making drastic decisions, such as replacing team members, it’s worth taking a step back to assess whether the organization provides the right environment, tools, and guidance for the team to succeed.

Ultimately, building and managing an effective sales team is an intricate process that requires a balanced approach. It involves ensuring that you have the right people in place and that these individuals are equipped, motivated, and aligned with the organization’s goals. As sales leaders and managers, it’s essential to identify and address gaps, foster a culture of continuous learning and improvement, and strategically align team structures and processes to drive sales performance.

For salespeople, sales managers, and CEOs of small companies, understanding these dynamics and adopting a holistic approach to sales management can significantly enhance their team’s effectiveness and their organization’s ability to achieve its sales objectives.

Actionable items that you can do today

  1. Evaluate Your Team’s Composition: Take a moment to assess the current structure of your sales team. Identify whether each member is in the role that best suits their skills and where they can contribute the most to the team’s objectives. This could involve one-on-one discussions to understand their goals, strengths, and areas for improvement.
  2. Initiate a Training Needs Analysis: Conduct a thorough training needs analysis to identify gaps in skills and knowledge within your sales team. This should cover everything from product knowledge to sales techniques and the use of CRM systems. Based on this analysis, outline a tailored training program to address these gaps and elevate your team’s performance.
  3. Review and Adjust Compensation Plans: Analyze your current compensation and incentive structures to ensure they align with your organizational goals and sales targets. Adjustments might be necessary to better motivate your team and encourage the behaviors and outcomes you wish to see. This could mean introducing new performance bonuses, adjusting commission rates, or implementing non-monetary rewards that drive motivation.
  4. Implement a Sales Enablement Strategy: Start developing or refining your sales enablement strategy to ensure your sales team has the tools, resources, and content they need to succeed. This could involve updating sales playbooks, improving CRM processes, or investing in new sales enablement technology. The goal is to make it easier for your sales team to sell effectively and efficiently.
The Art of Sales Compensation: Balancing Motivation and Goals

The Art of Sales Compensation: Balancing Motivation and Goals

Few topics in sales stir as much discussion and attention as compensation plans. The proper compensation structure can ignite a team’s performance, attract top talent, and drive a company toward its strategic goals. Conversely, a poorly conceived plan can lead to demotivation, high turnover, and missed targets. This discussion delves into the intricacies of designing compensation plans that motivate and align with a company’s broader objectives, offering insights for salespeople, sales managers, and CEOs alike.

Compensation in sales is not just about rewarding past successes; it’s a strategic tool that shapes future behavior. The fundamental premise is straightforward: sales professionals are motivated by earnings potential. Yet, applying this premise within compensation plans can be complex, nuanced, and sometimes contentious. It’s essential to balance base salary and variable compensation, ensuring sales representatives are adequately supported and incentivized to pursue new business aggressively.

The debate between 100% commission versus a guaranteed salary represents the spectrum of risk and reward in sales compensation. On one end, a 100% commission plan offers unlimited earning potential but lacks security, potentially leading to a high-stress culture and a short-term focus. It also makes it much more difficult to recruit younger sales superstars who may not have the financial security to afford a 100% commission compensation plan. Conversely, a guaranteed salary provides stability but might dampen the urgency and hunger that drive sales excellence. The consensus among seasoned sales leaders points to a balanced approach, often epitomized by a 50/50 split between base salary and variable compensation. This structure aims to provide a safety net while ensuring sales efforts directly impact earnings.

Understanding the market potential within a sales representative’s territory is critical when setting quotas and compensation. For larger teams, the ability to average performance across the group can help smooth out individual variances. However, in smaller teams or founder-led sales organizations, each member’s contribution is magnified, demanding a more nuanced approach to quota setting. Regardless of team size, aligning individual quotas with company objectives requires a blend of data analysis, market insight, and an appreciation for each territory’s unique challenges and opportunities.

Beyond the structure of compensation plans, the timing and criteria for payouts are pivotal. Monthly payouts can incentivize immediate results and help maintain momentum, whereas quarterly payouts may lead to strategic deal timing but can also introduce cash flow challenges for sales professionals. Moreover, compensation plans should evolve in tandem with a company’s strategic goals, ensuring that sales efforts are aligned with the organization’s overarching priorities.

Crafting effective sales compensation plans is both an art and a science. It demands a deep understanding of human motivation, a clear vision of company objectives, and a commitment to fairness and transparency. By carefully designing compensation structures that reward performance, foster team collaboration, and support long-term strategic goals, companies can create a sales culture that not only meets targets but exceeds them, driving growth and success in the competitive world of B2B sales.

Immediate Action Item 1: Evaluate and Adjust Your Compensation Structure

Assessment of Current Plans: Begin by thoroughly assessing your current sales compensation plan. This involves evaluating how well the existing structure supports your company’s strategic goals and motivates your sales team. Are your sales representatives meeting their targets? Do they feel motivated and supported? These questions can uncover valuable insights into the effectiveness of your compensation plan.

Balanced Compensation Review: Reflect on the balance between your organization’s base salary and variable compensation. Does it align with the 50/50 split recommended by seasoned sales leaders? If not, consider adjusting this balance to provide both security and incentive to your sales team. This balance is crucial for motivating your team while ensuring they are adequately supported.

Action Steps:

  • Survey your sales team to gather feedback on the current compensation plan.
  • Analyze sales performance data to identify patterns or areas for improvement.
  • Consult with HR or compensation specialists to explore potential adjustments.
  • Implement a pilot program for a new compensation structure in a small team or region to measure its impact before a company-wide rollout.

Immediate Action Item 2: Align Compensation with Strategic Goals and Territory Potential

Quota Setting and Territory Analysis: It’s essential to align individual quotas with the sales territory’s potential and the overarching company objectives. This alignment ensures that sales efforts are directed towards strategic goals, optimizing both individual and team performance.

Compensation Plan Evolution: Regularly review and update your compensation plans to align with your company’s strategic goals. This might mean adjusting the payout criteria, the balance between base and variable compensation, or the targets set for sales representatives.

Action Steps:

  • Conduct a territory analysis to ensure realistic quotas align with market potential.
  • Set up a quarterly review process for the compensation plan to ensure it remains aligned with company objectives and market conditions.
  • Engage sales managers in discussions about territory potential and strategic goals to ensure their input is considered in compensation planning.
  • Communicate changes in compensation plans clearly and effectively to the entire sales team, ensuring they understand how these changes benefit both them and the company.

Implementing these action items can lead to a more motivated sales team, better alignment with strategic goals, and improved sales performance. Remember, the key to successful sales compensation is not just in the design but in the ongoing evaluation and adjustment to meet the evolving needs of both your sales team and your company.

Beyond Numbers: The Leadership Behind Effective Quota Management

Beyond Numbers: The Leadership Behind Effective Quota Management

In B2B sales, mastering the art of quota setting and management is a critical factor driving sales teams’ success across various industries. Whether you’re navigating the complexities of software sales, the intricacies of service offerings, or the demands of manufacturing and distribution, the ability to set realistic yet challenging quotas can significantly impact your team’s performance and, ultimately, your company’s bottom line. This article delves into the essential aspects of quota management, offering valuable insights for salespeople, sales managers aiming to enhance their management capabilities, and CEOs of small companies who find themselves at the helm of sales or managing a team of sales professionals.

At the heart of effective sales management lies the strategic planning process, ideally kicking off well before the new fiscal year begins. Best practices in sales management suggest that CEOs should aim to deliver sales plans and quotas for the coming year by December 1st. This timeline allows sales teams ample opportunity to digest the new targets, make necessary preparations, and hit the ground running as the new year commences. Establishing clear expectations early on fosters a sense of direction and motivation among sales representatives, setting the stage for a productive and goal-oriented year ahead.

However, the task of quota setting extends beyond merely assigning numbers. It requires a deep understanding of your company’s strategic goals, market potential, and the individual capabilities of your sales team. For larger organizations, the luxury of averaging performance across a team can help mitigate the impact of underperformers, while in smaller teams, the challenge intensifies as each member’s contribution weighs heavily on achieving collective goals. Regardless of team size, the key is to strive for a balance that pushes your team to reach new heights without veering into unrealistic expectations.

Quota management also entails navigating the intricacies of assigning quotas that align with company objectives and market realities. Sales leaders must analyze available markets within their representatives’ territories, considering factors such as established customer relationships, potential for new account acquisition, and overall market demand. This analytical approach allows for quotas that are grounded in data and tailored to each sales territory’s unique dynamics.

Moreover, the discussion around quota management underscores the importance of fostering a sales culture that prioritizes relationship building within smaller teams focusing on named accounts and in larger settings where strategic goals dictate sales targets. The emphasis on relationships highlights the notion that successful sales strategies are built on a foundation of trust, understanding, and genuine connections with clients.

Quota setting and management emerge as pivotal elements in the broader sales strategy, demanding careful consideration, strategic planning, and an acute awareness of both internal capabilities and external market conditions. By adopting a methodical approach to quota management, sales leaders can empower their teams to achieve and surpass their targets, driving growth and success in an ever-evolving business environment.

Immediate Action Item 1: Conduct a Comprehensive Sales Team Assessment

Before setting quotas for the upcoming fiscal year, it’s imperative for sales leaders, including CEOs, sales managers, and other decision-makers, to thoroughly assess their sales team’s past performance, capabilities, and areas of improvement. This action item involves gathering data on individual sales representatives’ performance, understanding the strengths and weaknesses of the team, and identifying any gaps in skills or resources that could impact their ability to meet proposed quotas.

Steps to Implement:

  • Compile Performance Data: Collect and analyze sales performance data from the past year, focusing on metrics such as achieved versus set quotas, the average size of deals closed, the length of the sales cycle, and customer retention rates.
  • Evaluate Team Capabilities: Assess the skills and expertise of your sales team and determine if any skill gaps need to be addressed through training or hiring.
  • Set Preliminary Performance Benchmarks: Based on your assessment, set realistic performance benchmarks that consider both the achievements of top performers and the potential of those who are struggling.

This exercise not only aids in setting more accurate and attainable quotas but also provides insights into necessary training or resource allocation that could enhance the team’s overall performance.

Immediate Action Item 2: Align Quota Setting with Strategic Business Goals and Market Analysis

In tandem with assessing your sales team’s capabilities, aligning your quota-setting process with your company’s strategic business goals and a thorough market analysis is crucial. This ensures that the quotas reflect not just the capabilities of your sales team but also the realities of the market and your business’s aspirations.

Steps to Implement:

  • Conduct Market Analysis: Analyze the market dynamics specific to your industry, including potential for growth, competition, and emerging opportunities. This analysis should also consider the territories assigned to each sales rep, focusing on factors like existing customer relationships and the potential for new account acquisitions.
  • Review Strategic Business Goals: Revisit your company’s strategic objectives for the upcoming year. Quotas should not only be about meeting sales targets but also about contributing to the company’s broader goals, whether expanding into new markets, launching new products, or increasing market share.
  • Integrate Market Insights with Business Goals: Use the insights from your market analysis and the understanding of your strategic goals to set challenging yet achievable quotas tailored to the unique dynamics of each sales territory and aligned with where the company aims to grow.

By closely aligning quota setting with a deep understanding of your sales team’s capabilities, market conditions, and strategic business objectives, you create a roadmap for success that is both ambitious and grounded in reality. This approach not only sets your team up for achieving their targets but also ensures that their efforts directly contribute to the company’s overall growth and success.

These immediate actions, rooted in thorough analysis and strategic alignment, provide a solid foundation for setting realistic, motivating quotas that propel sales teams toward achieving exceptional results, thereby enhancing the company’s revenue generation capability and securing its competitive edge in the marketplace.

Boosting Profitability in Sales: Mastering the Art of Negotiation – Video 11 of the New Year Motivation Series

Boosting Profitability in Sales: Mastering the Art of Negotiation – Video 11 of the New Year Motivation Series

As we dive into the New Year, it’s crucial for sales professionals, managers, and CEOs of small companies to reflect on one pivotal aspect of their sales strategy – the art of negotiation. I am committed to guiding you toward more profitable deals this New Year and beyond.

Evaluating Past Deal Profitability

Take a moment to review your deals from the previous year. Were they as profitable as they could have been? The ease of offering discounts can often overshadow the challenge of selling at list price. However, your company’s profit model heavily relies on effective negotiation.

Look back at your past deals. Pinpoint the aspects where negotiations fell short. Set a clear goal for this year to avoid repeating these mistakes. Improvement begins with recognizing what didn’t work well in the past.

Embracing Continuous Learning in Negotiation

As I’ve emphasized in a previous video, continuous learning is crucial. This is particularly true in negotiation. A slight improvement in your negotiation skills can significantly impact your bottom line. Consider attending a class, webinar, or consulting with an expert to hone this skill.

If negotiation is not your forte, reach out for assistance. I’m here to offer suggestions, recommend training resources, or even provide personal training to help you negotiate more effectively.

Preparing for Negotiations Proactively

Prepare a list of items you can afford to discount and those you cannot. Develop scripts and strategies for common negotiation scenarios. This preparation will help you remain steadfast during negotiations, ensuring you don’t make concessions on a whim.

Identify services or add-ons you can offer during negotiations that provide value to your client but don’t significantly impact your costs. This strategy can be a game-changer in making your proposals more attractive while maintaining profitability.

This is the year to enhance your negotiation tactics. By doing so, you’re not just closing deals; you’re maximizing the value and profitability of each transaction. Remember, effective negotiation is not about conceding profits but finding a mutually beneficial ground where your company’s value is rightly recognized and compensated.

Happy New Year, and here’s to your profitability and success in the New Year!

Check out my video below (the final video in this year’s series to start the New Year with confidence and capability).

Revolutionize Your Sales Strategy: The Power of Streamlining Your Sales Process – Video 10 of the New Year Motivation Series

Revolutionize Your Sales Strategy: The Power of Streamlining Your Sales Process – Video 10 of the New Year Motivation Series

As we embark on this new year, it’s time to reevaluate and refine our sales strategies. My mission is to empower salespeople, sales managers, and CEOs of small companies to achieve remarkable growth this New Year. One crucial aspect that often goes overlooked is the efficiency of your sales process.

A Customer Relationship Management (CRM) system is more than a digital Rolodex; it’s a strategic tool that, when used effectively, can transform your sales process. Ensure that your CRM reflects and aids your sales process. If it doesn’t, you face a gap in your strategy and tools that needs immediate attention.

Take the time to map out your current sales process within your CRM. This exercise isn’t just about documentation; it’s about identifying bottlenecks and inefficiencies. Once you spot these, you can start making targeted improvements.

You may not solve all the problems overnight, but identifying and addressing even one bottleneck can significantly enhance productivity. A small change, like streamlining a step in your process or improving communication flow, can have a compound effect throughout the year.

Remember, you don’t have to do this alone. Your sales team, operations staff, and even your customers can provide invaluable insights into what’s working and what’s not. Collaborate with them to find ways to make your sales process smoother and more customer-friendly.

Your goal should be to make dealing with your company as seamless as possible for your clients. Imagine a scenario where your customers view working with you as the easiest part of their day. This level of customer experience can set you apart in a competitive market.

As we move forward in the New Year, I challenge you to enhance your sales process proactively. A well-optimized sales process increases your team’s productivity and elevates the customer experience.

Make this year count by refining your approach to sales. Good luck, and here’s to a year of effective selling and remarkable growth!

For more insights into this process, watch my video below.

Embrace Continuous Learning for Sales Success in 2024 – Video 9 of the New Year Motivation Series

Embrace Continuous Learning for Sales Success in 2024 – Video 9 of the New Year Motivation Series

In the ever-evolving world of sales, resting on your laurels is not an option. My mission is to inspire small company sales professionals, managers, and CEOs to seek knowledge and improvement constantly. As we venture into the New Year, let’s focus on embracing continuous learning to elevate your sales game.

The first step towards growth is acknowledging there’s always more to learn. With 38 years of experience in sales, I still actively seek new tools, techniques, and ways of presenting. This mindset is crucial for everyone in sales – from the rookie to the veteran.

Immersing yourself in your industry is key. Subscribe to at least two industry newsletters this week. These resources will keep you updated on your field’s latest trends, challenges, and innovations. It’s vital to stay informed and conversant about the evolving landscape of your industry.

Podcasts are a goldmine of information and can be a convenient learning method. I host two sales-focused podcasts, ‘Two Tall Guys Talking Sales‘ and ‘Driving New Sales,’ which offer weekly insights into sales best practices. However, don’t limit yourself – explore other sales and industry-specific podcasts to broaden your knowledge.

Commit to daily reading about sales and your specific industry. Early mornings or commute times are perfect for catching up on the latest articles and insights. Sharing interesting findings with your team or on platforms like LinkedIn can enhance your professional network and credibility.

If you’re in a leadership role, guiding your team through this continuous learning journey is part of your responsibility. Encourage your team to share new insights and strategies, fostering a culture of knowledge and improvement.

No matter where you are in your career, there’s room for improvement. Set personal goals for learning and betterment this year. It’s not just about closing more deals; it’s about becoming a more knowledgeable, versatile, and successful sales professional.

As we embrace this new year, let’s commit to continuous learning and improvement in our sales careers. It’s not just about staying ahead; it’s about setting a new standard for excellence in sales.

Good luck, and here’s to a year of growth and successful selling! Please enjoy the video below, in which I discuss this concept even more.

Elevating Your Sales Game in the New Year: The Essential Guide to Social Selling – Video 8 of the New Year Motivation Series

Elevating Your Sales Game in the New Year: The Essential Guide to Social Selling – Video 8 of the New Year Motivation Series

Understanding and leveraging social selling has become more crucial in a business landscape where digital presence can make or break your sales success. I guide salespeople, sales managers, and CEOs of small companies through the intricacies of social selling to ensure a solid start to the New Year.

Crafting Your Digital Persona

Your online profile, especially on LinkedIn, is often your first impression of a potential client. Is your profile projecting you as a job seeker, or does it establish you as an industry leader and expert? Updating your social media profiles to reflect your professional expertise and the value you bring to your clients is a crucial step.

Consistently sharing relevant industry content is not just about staying active online; it’s about positioning yourself as a knowledgeable and engaged leader in your field. This could be anything from exciting news articles to insightful blog posts that align with your industry and the solutions your company offers.

Engaging with Prospects on Social Platforms

While direct outreach is valuable, the real power of social selling lies in the research and insight phase. When you find a potential client on a platform like LinkedIn, engage with them by sharing content that resonates with their needs or challenges. It’s about building a connection and demonstrating value before the first sales conversation begins.

Setting Goals for Social Media Interaction

Commit to a regular posting and interaction schedule on your chosen social media platform. Aim to publish new, thoughtful content weekly, and make sure to engage with your network. This consistent presence ensures prospects find an industry professional actively contributing to the industry conversation when they research you.

Are you aware of your Social Selling Index (SSI) on LinkedIn? It’s a valuable metric that helps you gauge your effectiveness in social selling. Set goals to improve your SSI by being more active and engaging and providing value through your posts and interactions.

Attend virtual industry events and webinars. This broadens your knowledge and increases your visibility among peers and potential clients. Aim for at least one event per month to maintain a consistent presence.

In this New Year, your ability to harness the power of social selling can significantly impact your sales results. It’s not just about being present online; it’s about strategically building your digital persona to attract and engage with the right prospects.

For more insights on effectively using social selling to boost your revenue, check out my video series with the latest installment below. Let’s make this year a milestone in your sales journey.

Happy selling, and best wishes for a prosperous year ahead!

The Follow-Up Formula: Driving Sales Success in the New Year – Video 7 of the New Year Motivation Series

The Follow-Up Formula: Driving Sales Success in the New Year – Video 7 of the New Year Motivation Series

As we venture into the New Year, the key to propelling your sales, whether you’re a seasoned sales manager, a striving CEO of a small company, or an enthusiastic salesperson, lies in one critical skill: effective follow-up. My video series aims to arm you with best practices to ensure this year is your most successful yet.

A common pitfall in sales is failing to follow up swiftly and effectively. Every interaction with a client or prospect should be promptly followed by a thank you note or email. This small act signals your dedication and interest in the client’s needs. If you’re leading a team, make it a non-negotiable standard – a follow-up within 24 hours is a must.

A well-implemented CRM system is a game-changer for managing follow-ups. It should facilitate sending personalized emails with just a few clicks. If your CRM process is cumbersome, it’s time to reassess and streamline your approach. Remember, if following up feels like a chore, you’re not using your CRM effectively.

One of the golden rules in sales is to schedule the next one before ending a meeting. This practice helps maintain momentum and keeps you at the forefront of your client’s mind. It eliminates the hassle of tracking someone down later and significantly reduces the chances of being ‘ghosted.’

Consistency in follow-up is vital, but so is adapting your strategy to fit your industry’s unique rhythm. Whether it’s a few days or a month later, re-engage with clients who haven’t responded. This persistence shows your commitment to providing solutions. However, constantly tailor your follow-up timing to suit the client’s needs and industry norms.

Make following up a habit, not an afterthought. Whether you’re a VP of Sales ensuring your team adheres to this practice or a CEO looking to make a significant impact this year, diligent follow-up can be the difference between a good year and a fantastic one. Set reminders, use calendar alerts, and let your CRM be your guide in this journey.

This year, let’s resolve to excel in our follow-up game. It’s not just a sales tactic; it’s a fundamental aspect of building lasting relationships and driving success. Check out my other videos for more insights and strategies to kick-start your sales year with a bang. With the right approach, 2024 can be a year of remarkable achievements in your sales career.

Happy selling, and here’s to making this year not just great but phenomenal!