Optimizing Sales Territories for Growth and Efficiency

Optimizing Sales Territories for Growth and Efficiency


Territory design is critical for ensuring efficient revenue generation and optimal team performance. Sales leaders, especially those at the helm of small—to mid-sized companies, must revisit and potentially recalibrate their territory strategies to accommodate growth and maintain competitiveness.

Effective territory management starts with a clear understanding of the business landscape. Ensuring that each salesperson has a viable area with ample opportunity is crucial. This may sound straightforward but involves a delicate balance of geographic and customer-based considerations. For instance, some businesses might operate on a model where territories are defined by customer types or specific named accounts, which could include focusing on a set number of businesses to target. On the other hand, more geographically expansive businesses might allocate territories based on regions, such as counties or states, depending on their size and scope.

Moreover, there’s an art to knowing when and how to split or expand territories without diluting the quality of customer relationships or the sales team’s morale. For example, if a territory becomes too large and unwieldy, it might necessitate division to maintain or increase effectiveness. However, this division must be approached with sensitivity and strategy, ensuring it does not merely become a means to reduce commission costs but rather a method to enhance coverage and customer engagement.

The challenge often lies in the execution. Realigning territories can be as complex as managing a new product launch or entering a new market. Factors such as supply chain logistics, warranty services, and resource allocation must all be considered to ensure the new territory design supports immediate sales goals and long-term business growth.

Sales leaders must also be adept at navigating the internal dynamics of territory adjustments. For instance, a well-performing salesperson might view the reduction of their territory as a punitive measure, rather than an opportunity to enhance focus and potentially increase earnings from a more concentrated area. It is crucial for management to communicate effectively, ensuring that the team understands these changes are aimed at optimizing the entire sales process and enhancing their ability to meet customer needs more effectively.

Ultimately, the goal of territory design should align with the overarching business strategy aimed at growth and sustainability. This includes not only deciding the physical or conceptual boundaries of each territory but also ensuring that each sales team member is positioned to succeed, supported by robust training and resources, and motivated by a clear understanding of their role in the company’s broader objectives.

As companies prepare for another business cycle, revisiting the principles of effective territory management could be the key to unlocking new levels of success and stability. This strategic approach helps maintain a competitive edge and supports a healthy, dynamic sales culture that adapts to the changing landscapes of industries and markets.

Actionable suggestions that sales managers can do today:

  1. Conduct a Territory Audit: Review your current sales territories by evaluating sales data, customer distribution, and team feedback. Identify areas where territories may be too large or too small and assess the potential for restructuring to improve coverage and salesperson efficiency. This will help you understand if your current design aligns with optimal market coverage and team capabilities.
  2. Initiate a Team Discussion: Meet your sales team to discuss the current territory alignment. Use this opportunity to gather insights directly from those on the ground about their territories’ challenges and opportunities. This feedback is invaluable for making informed decisions about potential territory realignments or adjustments to meet customer needs and company goals.
Building High-Performing Sales Teams through Strategic Alignment

Building High-Performing Sales Teams through Strategic Alignment

The challenge of aligning the right people with the right organizational roles is paramount. As sales leaders and CEOs of small companies, understanding the intricacies of building and maintaining a proficient sales team is crucial for driving growth and achieving success.

The concept of having the “right people in the right seats” is not just a matter of recruitment but an ongoing process of evaluation, development, and strategic alignment. It’s essential to recognize that the adequacy of a sales team is not solely dependent on individual capabilities but also on how these individuals fit within the broader sales strategy and organizational culture.

Compensation plans, customer relationship management (CRM) systems, and the overarching sales infrastructure play significant roles in enabling sales teams to perform at their best. However, the foundation of a high-performing sales team lies in the continuous investment in people. This involves identifying talent and fostering an environment that promotes learning, growth, and adaptation.

Training and development are often overlooked aspects of sales management. Surprisingly, a significant number of sales professionals and leaders go years without receiving formal training. This gap in skill development can lead to stagnation and inefficiency. Therefore, organizations must prioritize ongoing education and training to keep their sales teams agile and competitive.

Furthermore, it is critical that individual roles align with the organization’s goals. This may involve reevaluating existing roles, responsibilities, and processes to ensure they contribute effectively to the sales strategy. Sometimes, the solution does not lie in hiring new talent but in optimizing the current team’s structure and roles to leverage their strengths more effectively.

Performance improvement plans (PIPs) and the concept of “top-grading” the sales team highlight the importance of accountability and continuous improvement. While PIPs can be a tool for addressing performance issues, they should not be the first resort. Instead, leaders should focus on setting clear expectations, providing the necessary resources and support, and fostering a culture of excellence.

Sometimes, the issue may not be with the sales personnel but with the systems, processes, or even the leadership approach. Before making drastic decisions, such as replacing team members, it’s worth taking a step back to assess whether the organization provides the right environment, tools, and guidance for the team to succeed.

Ultimately, building and managing an effective sales team is an intricate process that requires a balanced approach. It involves ensuring that you have the right people in place and that these individuals are equipped, motivated, and aligned with the organization’s goals. As sales leaders and managers, it’s essential to identify and address gaps, foster a culture of continuous learning and improvement, and strategically align team structures and processes to drive sales performance.

For salespeople, sales managers, and CEOs of small companies, understanding these dynamics and adopting a holistic approach to sales management can significantly enhance their team’s effectiveness and their organization’s ability to achieve its sales objectives.

Actionable items that you can do today

  1. Evaluate Your Team’s Composition: Take a moment to assess the current structure of your sales team. Identify whether each member is in the role that best suits their skills and where they can contribute the most to the team’s objectives. This could involve one-on-one discussions to understand their goals, strengths, and areas for improvement.
  2. Initiate a Training Needs Analysis: Conduct a thorough training needs analysis to identify gaps in skills and knowledge within your sales team. This should cover everything from product knowledge to sales techniques and the use of CRM systems. Based on this analysis, outline a tailored training program to address these gaps and elevate your team’s performance.
  3. Review and Adjust Compensation Plans: Analyze your current compensation and incentive structures to ensure they align with your organizational goals and sales targets. Adjustments might be necessary to better motivate your team and encourage the behaviors and outcomes you wish to see. This could mean introducing new performance bonuses, adjusting commission rates, or implementing non-monetary rewards that drive motivation.
  4. Implement a Sales Enablement Strategy: Start developing or refining your sales enablement strategy to ensure your sales team has the tools, resources, and content they need to succeed. This could involve updating sales playbooks, improving CRM processes, or investing in new sales enablement technology. The goal is to make it easier for your sales team to sell effectively and efficiently.
The Art of Sales Compensation: Balancing Motivation and Goals

The Art of Sales Compensation: Balancing Motivation and Goals

Few topics in sales stir as much discussion and attention as compensation plans. The proper compensation structure can ignite a team’s performance, attract top talent, and drive a company toward its strategic goals. Conversely, a poorly conceived plan can lead to demotivation, high turnover, and missed targets. This discussion delves into the intricacies of designing compensation plans that motivate and align with a company’s broader objectives, offering insights for salespeople, sales managers, and CEOs alike.

Compensation in sales is not just about rewarding past successes; it’s a strategic tool that shapes future behavior. The fundamental premise is straightforward: sales professionals are motivated by earnings potential. Yet, applying this premise within compensation plans can be complex, nuanced, and sometimes contentious. It’s essential to balance base salary and variable compensation, ensuring sales representatives are adequately supported and incentivized to pursue new business aggressively.

The debate between 100% commission versus a guaranteed salary represents the spectrum of risk and reward in sales compensation. On one end, a 100% commission plan offers unlimited earning potential but lacks security, potentially leading to a high-stress culture and a short-term focus. It also makes it much more difficult to recruit younger sales superstars who may not have the financial security to afford a 100% commission compensation plan. Conversely, a guaranteed salary provides stability but might dampen the urgency and hunger that drive sales excellence. The consensus among seasoned sales leaders points to a balanced approach, often epitomized by a 50/50 split between base salary and variable compensation. This structure aims to provide a safety net while ensuring sales efforts directly impact earnings.

Understanding the market potential within a sales representative’s territory is critical when setting quotas and compensation. For larger teams, the ability to average performance across the group can help smooth out individual variances. However, in smaller teams or founder-led sales organizations, each member’s contribution is magnified, demanding a more nuanced approach to quota setting. Regardless of team size, aligning individual quotas with company objectives requires a blend of data analysis, market insight, and an appreciation for each territory’s unique challenges and opportunities.

Beyond the structure of compensation plans, the timing and criteria for payouts are pivotal. Monthly payouts can incentivize immediate results and help maintain momentum, whereas quarterly payouts may lead to strategic deal timing but can also introduce cash flow challenges for sales professionals. Moreover, compensation plans should evolve in tandem with a company’s strategic goals, ensuring that sales efforts are aligned with the organization’s overarching priorities.

Crafting effective sales compensation plans is both an art and a science. It demands a deep understanding of human motivation, a clear vision of company objectives, and a commitment to fairness and transparency. By carefully designing compensation structures that reward performance, foster team collaboration, and support long-term strategic goals, companies can create a sales culture that not only meets targets but exceeds them, driving growth and success in the competitive world of B2B sales.

Immediate Action Item 1: Evaluate and Adjust Your Compensation Structure

Assessment of Current Plans: Begin by thoroughly assessing your current sales compensation plan. This involves evaluating how well the existing structure supports your company’s strategic goals and motivates your sales team. Are your sales representatives meeting their targets? Do they feel motivated and supported? These questions can uncover valuable insights into the effectiveness of your compensation plan.

Balanced Compensation Review: Reflect on the balance between your organization’s base salary and variable compensation. Does it align with the 50/50 split recommended by seasoned sales leaders? If not, consider adjusting this balance to provide both security and incentive to your sales team. This balance is crucial for motivating your team while ensuring they are adequately supported.

Action Steps:

  • Survey your sales team to gather feedback on the current compensation plan.
  • Analyze sales performance data to identify patterns or areas for improvement.
  • Consult with HR or compensation specialists to explore potential adjustments.
  • Implement a pilot program for a new compensation structure in a small team or region to measure its impact before a company-wide rollout.

Immediate Action Item 2: Align Compensation with Strategic Goals and Territory Potential

Quota Setting and Territory Analysis: It’s essential to align individual quotas with the sales territory’s potential and the overarching company objectives. This alignment ensures that sales efforts are directed towards strategic goals, optimizing both individual and team performance.

Compensation Plan Evolution: Regularly review and update your compensation plans to align with your company’s strategic goals. This might mean adjusting the payout criteria, the balance between base and variable compensation, or the targets set for sales representatives.

Action Steps:

  • Conduct a territory analysis to ensure realistic quotas align with market potential.
  • Set up a quarterly review process for the compensation plan to ensure it remains aligned with company objectives and market conditions.
  • Engage sales managers in discussions about territory potential and strategic goals to ensure their input is considered in compensation planning.
  • Communicate changes in compensation plans clearly and effectively to the entire sales team, ensuring they understand how these changes benefit both them and the company.

Implementing these action items can lead to a more motivated sales team, better alignment with strategic goals, and improved sales performance. Remember, the key to successful sales compensation is not just in the design but in the ongoing evaluation and adjustment to meet the evolving needs of both your sales team and your company.

Two Tall Guys Talking Sales Podcast – Sales Mastery with Tom Daly: Transforming Newbies into Business Leaders – E80

Two Tall Guys Talking Sales Podcast – Sales Mastery with Tom Daly: Transforming Newbies into Business Leaders – E80

Join hosts Kevin Lawson and Sean O’Shaughnessey on “Two Tall Guys Talking Sales” for another enriching episode, this time featuring the insightful Tom Daly from Focus Insights Group. Building on the momentum of our previous conversation in the last episode of Two Tall Guys Talking Sales, Tom delves deeper into the world of sales, sharing his expertise on nurturing new talent and guiding companies to refine their sales strategies for sustained success. Whether you’re a fledgling salesperson or a seasoned executive, Tom’s advice is bound to enlighten and inspire.

Key Topics Discussed

  1. Transitioning from Pitch Person to Business Leader: Tom offers invaluable advice for new sales professionals on evolving from knowing just the features and benefits of their products to becoming strategic business advisors to their clients.
  2. The Importance of a Structured Onboarding Program: Emphasizing the critical role of a meticulously planned onboarding process to ensure new salespeople are set up for success from day one.
  3. Role of Sales Management in Nurturing New Talent: Discussion on how sales managers should not just be top sales producers but mentors who demonstrate, guide, and provide constructive feedback to their teams.
  4. Building a Sales Strategy: Tom underlines the necessity for sales managers to have a clear, actionable sales strategy aligned with the company’s business plan to drive success.
  5. Sales as a Business Management Function: Reinforcing the concept that effective sales management is synonymous with astute business management, focusing on strategic planning and execution.

Key Quotes

Tom Daley:

“You have to demonstrate. Then you have to do it. Then you have to have somebody try it, then you have to critique them and then you have to show them again and rinse and repeat.”

Sean O’Shaughnessey:

“I really try to teach my salespeople to think like a business person. It helps them a lot when they start to negotiate because now we can negotiate like a business person as opposed to a salesperson that wants a commission check.”

Kevin Lawson:

“Practice makes easy, not practice makes perfect. Practice makes easy because, man, I love your phrase. It’s an unnatural human behavior to start cold calling.”

Additional Resources

  • Sales Xceleration: Tom’s brand and passion, offering sales optimization services. – www.salesxceleration.com
  • Focus Insights Group, LLC: Learn more about Tom’s consultancy, which helps clients achieve their best sales year. – Focus Insights Group, LLC

Summary

This episode of “Two Tall Guys Talking Sales” with Tom Daly has been a deep dive into the art and science of building a successful sales career and managing a sales team effectively. Tom’s seasoned perspective sheds light on transitioning from being a pitch-focused salesperson to a strategic business advisor, offering actionable strategies for salespeople at every career stage. With a focus on the importance of structured onboarding, the critical role of sales management, and the development of a solid sales strategy, this conversation is a treasure trove for anyone looking to elevate their sales game.

If you’re a new salesperson looking to make your mark, a sales manager aiming to nurture your team, or a CEO striving for sales excellence, this episode is packed with wisdom you won’t want to miss. Download now and start transforming your sales approach today.

Two Tall Guys Talking Sales – Mastering the Art of Sales: Strategies to Outshine Your Competitors in 2024 – E68

Two Tall Guys Talking Sales – Mastering the Art of Sales: Strategies to Outshine Your Competitors in 2024 – E68

Welcome to another insightful episode of “Two Tall Guys Talking Sales,” where hosts Kevin Lawson and Sean O’Shaughnessey delve into the art of salesmanship. In this episode, Sean, author of “Eliminate Your Competition,” shares his expertise on outmaneuvering the competition and achieving sales success in 2024. Join us for a deep dive into the strategies that can transform your sales approach and set you up for a prosperous year.

Key Topics Discussed

  1. Understanding Competition: Sean emphasizes the importance of competition in sales, explaining how it can actually benefit the sales process by reducing the likelihood of a ‘no decision’ outcome.
  2. Five Sales Strategies: Sean outlines the five fundamental sales strategies – Frontal, Flanking, Fragment, Defend, and Develop – and explains how each can be effectively utilized in different sales scenarios.
  3. Strategy in Detail:
    1. Frontal Strategy: Focused on leveraging clear advantages over competitors, requiring excellence in execution and resource intensity.
    2. Flanking Strategy: Involves shifting the customer’s focus to new issues that favor your solution, requiring a deep understanding of the customer’s needs.
    3. Fragment Strategy: Useful for politically weaker positions or less feature-rich products, focusing on a subset of issues.
    4. Defend Strategy: Essential for existing customers, focusing on expanding influence and defending against competitors.
    5. Develop Strategy: Ideal for long-term engagement where immediate purchase isn’t imminent, focusing on building credibility and relationships.
  4. Salesperson Types and Strategies: Sean discusses how different types of salespeople, like Trappers, Hunters, Farmers, and Gatherers, may prefer different strategies based on their strengths and sales approach.

Key Quotes

  • Sean: “Competition is a good thing in sales. It often means you’re more likely to avoid losing a deal to No Decision.”

Additional Resources

  • Book: “Eliminate Your Competition: A Trapper’s Guide to Increasing Your Commission” by Sean O’Shaughnessey, available wherever books are sold – https://amzn.to/2K37ugx.

Summary

In this episode of “Two Tall Guys Talking Sales,” Sean O’Shaughnessey shares invaluable insights from his book “Eliminate Your Competition,” guiding listeners through various sales strategies to outsmart competitors in 2024. Whether you’re a seasoned sales professional or new to the field, this episode offers a wealth of knowledge on approaching sales challenges creatively and effectively. Tune in to learn how to adapt these strategies to your sales style and set yourself up for a successful year in sales.

Two Tall Guys Talking Sales – Mastering Sales Compensation: Strategies for Business Growth – Episode 58

Two Tall Guys Talking Sales – Mastering Sales Compensation: Strategies for Business Growth – Episode 58

Are you struggling to create a sales compensation plan that aligns with your business goals and motivates your sales team? Look no further! In this episode of Two Tall Guys Talking Sales, hosts Kevin Lawson and Sean O’Shaughnessey dive deep into the intricacies of crafting effective sales compensation plans. With decades of experience in sales and management, Kevin and Sean share invaluable insights on how to set up your sales team for success. Whether you’re a startup aiming for your first million or an established business looking to optimize, this episode is a must-listen!

Key Topics Discussed

  • The Importance of Timely Compensation Plans: Why releasing compensation plans in line with the fiscal year is crucial for sales teams.
  • Simplicity is Key: The need for straightforward, easy-to-understand compensation plans.
  • Aligning Compensation with Business Goals: How to incentivize behaviors that align with your company’s objectives.
  • Understanding Costs and Profitability: The role of CEOs and CFOs in determining the budget for sales commissions.
  • Attracting Talent with Compensation Plans: How a well-structured plan can be a recruitment tool for top sales talent.

Key Quotes

  • Kevin Lawson: “Compensation plans are the bedrock for someone’s income. And we should treat it as such, not as a cost line.”
  • Sean O’Shaughnessey: “The magic of writing a great compensation plan is to make sure that you maximize the things that you want to maximize to grow your business within that budget that you put together.”

Additional Resources

Summary

Don’t miss out on this episode if you want to revamp or create a sales compensation plan that works. Kevin and Sean offer a comprehensive guide that covers everything from the timing of releasing plans to aligning them with your business goals. Tune in to Two Tall Guys Talking Sales and equip yourself with the knowledge to build a compensation plan that retains and attracts top sales talent. Start setting your sales team—and your business—up for success today!

Nine of Spades: Addressing Salesperson Underperformance: Setting Performance Benchmarks: Define standards for success to measure against.

Nine of Spades: Addressing Salesperson Underperformance: Setting Performance Benchmarks: Define standards for success to measure against.

Understanding the Nature of Sales Benchmarks

Let’s start by grounding ourselves in the foundational premise: Sales benchmarks are not merely numerical goals but the defining coordinates of success. If you will, consider them as your organization’s North Star, guiding your sales team through the complexities of quotas, customer relationships, and revenue targets. Benchmarks transcend the limitations of raw numbers and extend into the realm of qualitative assessment—whether it’s the ability to understand customer needs or to align solutions accordingly.

To further clarify, think of benchmarks as akin to a financial portfolio’s balance of risk and return. They offer a comprehensive view of performance, much like a diversified portfolio that offers an integrated financial health assessment. Each component—be it customer retention rates, average deal sizes, or response times—contributes to this multifaceted view. Benchmarks thereby act as a composite score that tells you where you are, where you should be, and, most importantly, how to get there.

The Nuances of Crafting Benchmarks: It’s About Alignment

Creating effective benchmarks requires alignment with broader organizational goals, current market realities, and the sales team’s inherent capabilities. Striking this balance is akin to setting the interest rate in an economy. Set it too high, and you risk stalling growth; set it too low and invite complacency.

Thus, the process of setting benchmarks demands an understanding of averages and outliers. If a high percentage of your sales team consistently meets the benchmarks, they may not be challenging enough. Conversely, if only a small fraction achieves them, it could demoralize the rest and raise questions about the benchmarks’ attainability. The idea is to challenge your team just enough to stretch their capabilities while ensuring the goals are rooted in reality.

Diagnosing and Addressing Underperformance: A Structured Approach

The objective of performance benchmarks isn’t to point fingers at underperformers but to provide a structured mechanism for evaluation and growth. Having established benchmarks, the onus shifts from mere identification to a deep-rooted understanding of ‘why’ the underperformance occurred.

Is it a lack of training? Is it a mismatch between talents and tasks? Or perhaps it’s a more systemic issue related to product-market fit? Each diagnosis demands its unique course of action, requiring leaders to blend empathy with decisiveness. As you identify these pain points, you’re not merely putting a spotlight on them; you’re transforming them into actionable insights. Provide the necessary tools, training, or environmental changes, and monitor the impact on performance against the set benchmarks. In this way, underperformance becomes not a point of failure but an opportunity for both personal and organizational growth.

Benchmarks: Your Compass in the World of Sales

To CEOs, Sales Managers, and leaders in the trenches, understand that performance benchmarks are not just numbers on a performance review sheet but the milestones on your roadmap to success. They offer a dynamic, multi-dimensional gauge by which to measure, evaluate, and, most crucially, enhance performance.

Just as a ship’s captain would be rudderless without a compass, your sales team would navigate in the dark without well-defined benchmarks. These are not mere numbers but signposts in your journey toward sales excellence. They offer a vision of what could be and a measurement of what is. Establishing and adhering to these benchmarks provides direction, clarity, and a lens through which to transform challenges into growth opportunities.

The Kaivac Impact: Harnessing Faith, Innovation, and Sales Excellence in the Cleaning Industry

The Kaivac Impact: Harnessing Faith, Innovation, and Sales Excellence in the Cleaning Industry

Bob Robinson, Jr., and his mechanical-engineer father, Bob Robinson, Sr., came up with the idea for a product the world truly needed 25 years ago: a “no-touch” restroom cleaning machine. Their company, Kaivac, is a Hamilton, OH-based manufacturer of cleaning machines. Hamilton is a suburb of Cincinnati, OH.

Bob Robinson, Jr.

“We were on our hands and knees, crawling around the bathroom,” recalls Bob, Jr. “It was disgusting. We said, ‘There’s got to be a better way.'” 

Through hard work and dedication, the Robinsons created the KaiVac to help solve that initial problem in public restrooms. Over the years, they grew the idea to create dedicated machines to clean kitchen floors, hallway floors, and grocery displays. Beyond its bathroom cleaning technology, it has expanded into floor cleaning and spill response machines and has 18 patents with 16 pending.

Along with growing their manufacturing capabilities, they also grew their sales capabilities. They adopted a hybrid strategy of selling through distribution and selling directly to key customers. Their direct team, under the leadership of Bob Robinson, Jr., who had taken on the role of VP of Sales, closed many enviable customers with massive deals, including Walmart, Kroger, and Target.

They realized that they needed to step up their sales professionalism after having a down year during COVID after having a record-breaking year the year before. They wanted to grow to $75 million in annual revenue within three years and a Big Hairy Audacious Goal (BHAG) of $1 billion in annual revenue within 20 years. 

Bob Jr. says Kaivac is just getting started. “At 20 to 25 years in business, you’re at an inflection point where you’ve got resources, tenure, and history and have been through ‘adolescence,'” he says. “Now is the chance to build a professionalized organization.”

They contacted New Sales Expert LLC as the nation was coming out of the global pandemic, but before all the supply chain problems had paused. New Sales Expert LLC is a fractional vice president of sales consultancy. Sean O’Shaughnessey, the CEO of New Sales Expert, is aligned with SalesXceleration and has 38 years of experience in sales and sales management.

According to Sean, “Kaivac is a joy to work with. They are the shining star of Hamilton, OH, and Butler County. They had so much raw potential when I walked in the door; all I had to do was to focus their energy and enthusiasm on working smarter and just a little harder.”

Building an organization with a heart

Bob Robinson, Sr.

Kaivac had a great culture to build on to make a great sales culture. Before Sean showed up, the company leadership had already developed their One-Page Strategic Plan and their “Why?” statement that reflects the owners’ Christian faith: “To glorify God by using KAIVAC as an instrument for Good.” 

In addition to the “Why?” statement, they had drafted an acronym called FIGS that conveys the “heart” of the company. FIGS—which appears on signs that hang on the factory floor and in break rooms—stands for 

  • F: “First shall be last, last shall be first.”
  • I: Integrity—as in “The truth shall set you free.”
  • G: Golden Rule—meaning “treat others how you want to be treated.”
  • S: Servant’s Heart, as in “We are in a race to help people.”

The company uses the first three letters of its name–KAI–to inspire the team’s thinking and actions. These letters stand for inspiring phrases such as: “Keep At It,” “Keep Always Improving,” “Keep Attempting the Impossible,” and “(creates) Kick-Ass Inventions.” 

Prioritizing net income and growth

Sean’s first change was to make a compensation plan that motivated the sales team to sell bigger deals and to sell them quickly. Kaivac implemented a 50/50 plan in concert with defined territories to keep the Key Account salespeople focused on the goal of more significant and profitable orders.

After the motivation component was in place, it was time to help the team learn how to sell big deals more repeatedly. The big deals of the past had been challenging to work on and, while very profitable, had been disruptive to close. Sean encouraged the company to read John McMahon’s book, “The Qualified Sales Leader,” and with that tome as inspiration, quickly deployed MEDDPICCC to help them qualify deals. 

MEDDPICCC by itself is not enough. The company had already licensed Salesforce, one of the highest-rated CRMs on the market, but Sean put MEDDPICCC into the various stages of the sales process to ensure that the salespeople knew all the required information about a big deal. Sean also created dashboards within Salesforce to track deal progress at the management level. The company implemented Sales Plans for Key Accounts and the Power Matrix to document the most influential people in the customer’s decision-making process.

The very first big deals that the company found after Sean started to help them also benefited from the Decision Timeline. The Decision Timeline is a tool to allow the sales team to walk through the entire decision-making process of the customer to understand all of the steps required to make a significant investment decision. It allowed frank and honest conversations to take place with the prospect as the team worked to close the largest deal in the company’s history to date.

Time to run on their own

Mike Perazzo, Allen Randolph, Bob Robinson, Jr., and Nick Wehby after passing their Certified Sales Leader exams.

As with most of the assignments with New Sales Expert, LLC, the goal is to allow the company to run independently. Bob Robinson Jr. was the company’s VP of Sales. Still, he needed to shed those responsibilities to help run the entire company. To finish the transition, Bob and three of his leaders took SalesXceleration‘s Certified Sales Leadership course delivered by Sean O’Shaughnessey. 

The Certified Sales Leader (CSL) designation is the country’s most comprehensive sales leadership certification program offered. CSL leadership training and certification will prepare you with the analytical, tactical, and strategic sales management skills needed to drive revenue growth now…and into the future. CSL training expands the skill set of a Sales Manager by providing coaching, techniques, and tools to lead a successful sales team. 

All four Kaivac leaders passed the CSL test. One of them, Mike Perazzo, was tagged to take over as Executive Vice President of Sales. According to Mike, “Sean is a master coach for helping shape sales process and methodology. Following his methods will help grow sales faster, transactionally, and strategically. Often a couple of pieces of the puzzle are missing, and Sean helps quickly identify them.

You have everything to gain by having Sean look at your current approach. He is a change agent and disruptive to the status quo. Pushing the pace and flow of deals is his sweet spot. I am a better sales leader because of my time with him.”

Bob Robinson, Sr., and Jr. with their sales team celebrating a recent patent award

Sean O’Shaughnessey of New Sales Expert, LLC states, “Kaivac is a wonderful company. They have created a line of machines that gives pride to the workers in one of the toughest jobs in America – keeping things clean. They are focused on the success of their customers and their employees. They had all of the raw skills within their sales team to be a great sales organization; they only needed me to focus them on activities and techniques that allowed them to close bigger deals faster and at a higher profit level.”

“If anyone works in a clean building with clean restrooms and hard surface floors, they are either cleaning it with Kaivac technology or paying too much for that cleanliness,” Sean explains.

Revenue and profitability have grown since Sean helped Kaivac develop a higher level of sales professionalism. Recent results have shown a dramatic increase in revenue and profitability. The sales and revenue growth have allowed the entire family of Kaivac to prosper. The Robinsons have always considered their employees an extension of their family. The company’s prosperity is passed along to team members through a bonus structure for the whole company. It all fits into the spirit of Kaivac. Bob Jr. says, “Our organization was built to have heart.”

If you want to learn more about Kaivac, you can head to their website at www.Kaivac.com. You should also check out this video: The Story of Kaivac. Kaivac is on its way to outer space on revenue growth, and everyone should check out their entertaining Q3 kickoff video about the growth of Kaivac.

To learn more about Fractional Sales Management and how it can help your company, go to www.NewSales.Expert.

The Story of Kaivac
Two Tall Guys Talking Sales Podcast – The Art of Differentiation: How to Excel in Sales and Earn More Money – Episode 34

Two Tall Guys Talking Sales Podcast – The Art of Differentiation: How to Excel in Sales and Earn More Money – Episode 34

In this episode of Two Tall Guys Talking Sales, Sean O’Shaughnessey and Kevin Lawson discuss the importance of standing out and differentiating oneself in the competitive world of sales. They explore how salespeople can escape the commodity mindset and become trusted advisors to their clients, ultimately leading to more money and success.

Key takeaways from the episode include:

  • The importance of differentiating oneself in the sales process
  • Understanding and embracing the role of an expert in your field
  • “The Challenger Sale” book’s approach, and its impact on sales success
  • The dangers of proposing too early and devaluing your offering
  • Creating value for your clients by helping them be successful
  • Evaluating and improving your sales pipeline to increase revenue

The hosts also mention insightful books and previous podcast guests, such as Kelly Crandall and Jim Hardwick (both Fractional Sales VPs aligned with Sales Xceleration), who provide valuable perspectives on sales and leadership.

Sean and Kevin encourage our listeners to reach out with any questions or topics they would like to see covered in future episodes.

Don’t miss this episode full of practical advice and insights on improving your sales game, adding value to your clients, and ultimately making more money. Listen now to learn from the experts, and start transforming your sales approach today!